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10.1 Exporting From After Effects

OK, let’s bring it back to reality. You have had a taste of the incredible power of After Effects, but let’s wrap up by talking about how to export some of the cool stuff you have made! In this lesson, you will learn how to export from After Effects.

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1.Introduction
1 lesson, 00:49

1.1
Introduction
00:49

2.Getting Started
5 lessons, 42:55

2.1
What Is After Effects?
09:56

2.2
Main Panels
10:04

2.3
Settings
07:46

2.4
After Effects Tools
08:52

2.5
More AE Tools
06:17

3.Compositions and Layers
3 lessons, 26:35

3.1
After Effects Composition
08:53

3.2
Precomposing
08:10

3.3
After Effects Layer Properties
09:32

4.Keyframes
3 lessons, 25:21

4.1
After Effects Keyframe Basics
06:39

4.2
After Effects Keyframe Easing
10:37

4.3
Spatial Interpolation
08:05

5.Masks, Shape Layers, and Text
5 lessons, 45:36

5.1
Learn How to Mask in After Effects
08:42

5.2
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 1
09:24

5.3
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 2
10:05

5.4
Text in After Effects
07:16

5.5
Text Animation and More
10:09

6.2.5D
2 lessons, 13:42

6.1
What Is 2.5D?
08:37

6.2
More 2.5D
05:05

7.Motion Tracking
4 lessons, 34:04

7.1
Motion Tracking, Camera Tracking, and 3D Text
09:11

7.2
More Motion Tracking
06:15

7.3
Camera Tracking in After Effects
07:35

7.4
3D Text in After Effects
11:03

8.Mattes and Cool Effects
4 lessons, 43:43

8.1
Mattes
10:55

8.2
EFFECTS!
10:50

8.3
MORE EFFECTS!
11:19

8.4
Mind-Blowing Third-Party Effects
10:39

9.Build a Lower Third
2 lessons, 21:35

9.1
How to Make a Lower Third in After Effects
11:01

9.2
Final Touches on the Lower Third
10:34

10.Exporting
1 lesson, 09:11

10.1
Exporting From After Effects
09:11

11.Conclusion
1 lesson, 01:16

11.1
Conclusion
01:16

12.Bonus Lessons
4 lessons, 2:14:00

12.1
How to Make an After Effects Text Animation
29:19

12.2
How to Use After Effects Intro Templates
36:45

12.3
How to Create Handwriting Animation in After Effects
34:01

12.4
How to Create Brush Effects in After Effects
33:55

13.Frequently Asked Questions
8 lessons, 1:34:42

13.1
FAQ Introduction
00:55

13.2
How to Export Video From After Effects
12:26

13.3
How to Export Video From After Effects Using PreRendering
06:44

13.4
How to Mask in After Effects
15:25

13.5
How to Animate Text in After Effects
19:31

13.6
How to Make a GIF in After Effects
13:59

13.7
How to Duplicate Layer in After Effects
20:44

13.8
Conclusion
04:58


10.1 Exporting From After Effects

In this lesson you will learn how to export your projects from After Effects. If you've been following along in the course, you will have just created this very handsome looking lower third. And now, it's time to think about how you might use this in something else. Or maybe you've created something totally different and you want to export it from After Effects to something like YouTube, Facebook, or Vimeo. Not a problem. It's very, very easy. There's two things that you need to think about. The first is, is it going to be a final delivery type codec? That means is your project going to go to the place where it's going to be displayed, something like YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook, or maybe a client? In that case, it's probably going to be H.264. Or are you going to render an element from After Effects and use it in a video editor, maybe Premiere, maybe Resolve, maybe Avid, maybe Final Cut? That's gonna use a different type of codec. Now, technically, you can use H.264, but you shouldn't. There's a better type of codec, called an intermediate codec, that's much higher quality. So first, let's look at doing that. Now, in my comp, here, I have it selected. This background layer here with the video clip is a guide layer, so that's not going to render. And essentially, this project is going to render out and look like this. It's gonna have a transparent background. And then, my title is gonna render white where it is. So to get this out of After Effects, I'm gonna come up here to Composition > Add to Adobe Media Encoder. That's gonna send it over to Adobe Media Encoder. And by default, your comp is going to show up with the settings or the preset that you have last used in Adobe Media Encoder. So for this example, I'm going to need to change that because H.264 is not going to work for me because it doesn't have an alpha channel, it's not great quality. So I'm gonna change that. I'm gonna select the Quick Time format. And I'm going to pick a preset that has an alpha channel, something like Apple Pro Res 4444 with alpha, or GoPro Cinaform RGB 12-bit with alpha. Now, you may have noticed that I switched my project and I opened it up in CC 2019. And that's because as of CC 2019, specifically, Adobe Media Encoder version 13.0.2 Apple Pro Res is now an option. For these types of codecs where you going to be using it in a video editor, you're gonna be looking for an intermediate codec. And the three most popular are Avid's DNXHD/DNXHR, Apple Pro Res, or Go Pro Cineform. And previous to CC2019 version 13.O.2, Apple Pro Res has not been officially available for PC. There were ways to get your file encoded in a Pro Res format, but it wasn't official. And now that it is, you have that option. Prior to this, I have been using GoPro Cineform RGB 12-bit with Alpha. But either one of these will work as long as it has an Alpha channel. So I'm gonna select GoPro Cineform RGB 12-bit. I'm gonna select my destination for where I want this, and I'm just gonna save it in this folder right here. Now normally, if I am rendering this out to a project, I will create an After Effects renders folder. And then maybe more folders inside that folder with specific elements that I'm rendering out. But for now, I'm just gonna save it to the root directory of that folder there, and then press Start. And that's gonna get to work, and it's going to render that lower third. All righty. So that's rendered out and it's right here. And just to show you, if I pull this back into Adobe After Effects, it'll import. And I just wanna show you. I'm gonna pull it down and make a new composition. And you can see it renders exactly like we expected. It's got an alpha channel, the background is transparent, and so if we laid this over footage in another video editing application, it would work just fine. Now, if you're using something like Premier, there's actually other ways to get your titles from After Effects into Premier without rendering them out. But that's a little outside the scope of this lesson. All right, let's look at another example. Let's say you've made something really cool in After Effects and you want to export it so you can upload it to your YouTube, your Vimeo, your Facebook. Or maybe you've created a whole project for a client, and it's time to export it for your client. How are you going to that? Well, it's gonna be the same procedure, but you're gonna be thinking about using a different codec because we don't need something that is super super high bit rate. We want the standard kind of delivery codec, and at this point that's going to be H.264. So with this project selected, it doesn't have any alpha channel, I'm good to know with H.264. I'm gonna come up here to the menu, choose Add to Adobe Media Encoder, or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+M. And just like before, that gets added to AME, which is the abbreviation for Adobe Media Encoder. It came in using the same settings that I used last time, but I want to change the format to H.264. And when I do, I get a huge drop-down with all kinds of presets. Things for Facebook, for Twitter, for Vimeo, for YouTube. For example, if this was going to YouTube and my project was 1080, I would pick the YouTube 1080 Full HD. I'd choose the output file destination or where I wanted that file to be saved. Then I'd hit the start cue button, and it would get to work. Now, if you are rendering for a client, and they have very, very specific requirements for your delivery, which I've experienced many, many times. You're going to want to jump in to the Export Settings dialog box. And you can do that if you didn't catch that before. If you just click right here on the preset that will open up the export settings. And then over here on the right side, you have a bunch of options. On the left side, you can set some things, like you can set an in and an out point. And you can use Adobe Media Encoder for things other than exporting from Adobe After Effects. But for right now, let's just focus here on the left side. With the format of H.264 selected, you can get in here and really customize a ton of options. So underneath Video, we have lots of options. You can uncheck all of these things and change the resolution, change the frame rate, change the field order, all kinds of things here. I would guess that the things that you're probably going to have to look for are things like the bit rate, specifically the target bit rate and the maximum bit rate. At least in my experience, if a client has any kind of requirements, they're probably going to be looking for a specific bit rate or at least a minimum bit rate to hit. And that's just for the video side. There's a different section here for audio. In fact, audio has a codec. You can choose the audio codec, although it's very, very similar, AAC and different flavors of AAC. Whether its stereo or mono. And then, the bit rate for the audio. And there are more settings for you to explore and publish in captions. And over here in the Effects tab, this can be helpful for clients sometimes to do something like put a name overlay. And you can enable this. And then, you can put, let's say, the output file name. If I was sending this to a client, I would probably put something like a version number after the file name so I know which version it is, and then they'll know which version it is as well. I'd probably put it without the extension. I may put something like for approval, and then reposition that. It may be helpful to throw a time code overlay in as well so that when your client is reviewing the footage they have the actual time code so they can get very specific about any changes or feedback. If you want, you can create a preset over here and save all these settings for future use. And that's pretty much that. It's pretty simple to get things out of Adobe After Effects using Adobe Media Encoder. All right, that about wraps up this lesson. Make sure to check out the last lesson in this course where your gonna get some more resources for diving in deeper into After Effects.

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