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4.3 Spatial Interpolation

You have learned about temporal interpolation, but you can also adjust spatial interpolation as well! In this lesson, you'll learn how to modify the spatial interpolation of your animations.

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1.Introduction
1 lesson, 00:49

1.1
Introduction
00:49

2.Getting Started
5 lessons, 42:55

2.1
What Is After Effects?
09:56

2.2
Main Panels
10:04

2.3
Settings
07:46

2.4
After Effects Tools
08:52

2.5
More AE Tools
06:17

3.Compositions and Layers
3 lessons, 26:35

3.1
After Effects Composition
08:53

3.2
Precomposing
08:10

3.3
After Effects Layer Properties
09:32

4.Keyframes
3 lessons, 25:21

4.1
After Effects Keyframe Basics
06:39

4.2
After Effects Keyframe Easing
10:37

4.3
Spatial Interpolation
08:05

5.Masks, Shape Layers, and Text
5 lessons, 45:36

5.1
Learn How to Mask in After Effects
08:42

5.2
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 1
09:24

5.3
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 2
10:05

5.4
Text in After Effects
07:16

5.5
Text Animation and More
10:09

6.2.5D
2 lessons, 13:42

6.1
What Is 2.5D?
08:37

6.2
More 2.5D
05:05

7.Motion Tracking
4 lessons, 34:04

7.1
Motion Tracking, Camera Tracking, and 3D Text
09:11

7.2
More Motion Tracking
06:15

7.3
Camera Tracking in After Effects
07:35

7.4
3D Text in After Effects
11:03

8.Mattes and Cool Effects
4 lessons, 43:43

8.1
Mattes
10:55

8.2
EFFECTS!
10:50

8.3
MORE EFFECTS!
11:19

8.4
Mind-Blowing Third-Party Effects
10:39

9.Build a Lower Third
2 lessons, 21:35

9.1
How to Make a Lower Third in After Effects
11:01

9.2
Final Touches on the Lower Third
10:34

10.Exporting
1 lesson, 09:11

10.1
Exporting From After Effects
09:11

11.Conclusion
1 lesson, 01:16

11.1
Conclusion
01:16

12.Bonus Lessons
4 lessons, 2:14:00

12.1
How to Make an After Effects Text Animation
29:19

12.2
How to Use After Effects Intro Templates
36:45

12.3
How to Create Handwriting Animation in After Effects
34:01

12.4
How to Create Brush Effects in After Effects
33:55

13.Frequently Asked Questions
8 lessons, 1:34:42

13.1
FAQ Introduction
00:55

13.2
How to Export Video From After Effects
12:26

13.3
How to Export Video From After Effects Using PreRendering
06:44

13.4
How to Mask in After Effects
15:25

13.5
How to Animate Text in After Effects
19:31

13.6
How to Make a GIF in After Effects
13:59

13.7
How to Duplicate Layer in After Effects
20:44

13.8
FAQ Conclusion
04:58


4.3 Spatial Interpolation

In this lesson you are going to learn about spatial interpolation. I'm gonna pick up right where we left off in the last lesson. And I'm going to take my top layer here, the one where we were experimenting with the easing of the keyframes, and I'm gonna just get rid of it. And I'm gonna take this text layer, I'm going to click on Position to select all of the position keyframes, and I'm gonna position it just about in the center vertically. If you select your layer here you can see there are a collection of dots between these two points. If you put the CTI right in the middle of the animation, you can see this represents the starting keyframe. And this dot here represents the ending keyframe. And each one of these dots represents a frame, That the layer is going to be on at any point in time during this animation. Right now, these dots go in a straight line. And so when you're talking about the space or the path that it's taking, it's going in a straight line, so this is called Linear Spatial Interpolation, right? From point A to point B it take a straight line. So in terms of the space that the object is covering it's linear. But what if you didn't want this? What if you wanted the K to start here and stop here but maybe you didn't want it to go in a line, maybe you wanted it to go in an arc, up here. Would that mean somewhere in the middle we just add another keyframe? Well, no, because look, now, what we have a starting keyframe, and then we have a middle keyframe, but between those we have another line. So we could go again in the middle, and kind of make this into an arc, but that is kind of annoying. Plus, that would make it a little bit trickier to ease this animation if you wanted to. So let me show you another way, I'm just gonna delete this middle keyframes here. So if you have your key frames selected here and you right-click on them, you can go up in the little pop up menu and choose keyframe interpolation. And there'll be a little dialogue box that comes up here and you have some options. So you can see temporal interpolation which affects how property changes over time in a timeline that's set to linear, but you can choose some different options here. Spatial interpolation affects the shape of the path which is the motion path in this case because our object is moving. And if you click the drop-down here we have some options. We can set it to Linear which it is set to currently or we can set it to Bezier, Continuous Bezier, or Auto Bezier. Let's select Bezier, and then click OK. What we get now is we get a set of handles on our first keyframe and on the second keyframe here. So let's click on the first keyframe. And you can click and you can drag this handle, and you can make a curve. So now, you can have your object not take a straight line between two points, you can have it take a curve. And with these handles, you can get really specific on where you want this K to go. Let's just play this and see what's happening. Check that out. You could even set these in different directions and make kind of an S shape, if you will. You can drag this way out here. Sometimes it can be helpful to, Make the comp smaller so you can drag these handles out. All right, let's see what we have here. It's still only two key frames. But with these handles here and with the spatial interpolation set to Bezuer, now I have a lot more options. Now, there's a couple of different ways that you can enable this, you can right-click on the keyframes like we did before and go to keyframe interpolation and set it to Bezier. You can also, with the selection tool selected. If you hover over one of these keyframes, you can use keyboard modifiers. Ctrl+Alt, which for some reason are not coming on my key display here. But when you do that, you see, you get this little V tool, which you may have seen before in the Pen Tool options over here, and that is a convert vertex tool. And what that does is it would change this vertex text here from right now it's on Bezier. But if I click this with Ctrl+Alt held on my keyboard, it will convert this point back to a linear point. So now, this one is linear and this one still has the Bezier handle. But if I wanted to convert that one back to Bezier, no problem. With the selection tool, I can use Ctrl+Alt on the keyboard, or we can grab the pen tool and choose the convert vertex tool. And you can click it and it will become linear once again To go further, you could maybe set one more keyframe here in the middle, maybe just pulling it up like this. And then, We can convert this to a Bezier handled with the selection tool using Ctrl+Alt and that will give us this nice Bezier handle. Which this is a continuous Bezier, meaning that the handles move in tandem and you could make something like this. Maybe make some kind of loop here. It doesn't look spectacular, but I think you get the idea. If you hit Ctrl+Alt again you can grab one side of these handles. And this is called a bezier, where each side of this point has its own independently controllable handle and they're not linked together, or it's not doing a continuous curve. You're kind of breaking it here. And now you can do something even more intricate. So you can see it comes up here. We have a really sharp movement. So you have a lot of options when you're animating. Sometimes, you just wanted to go on a straight line but other times, you want things to go along a curve and doing that is a lot simpler than you would think. And you can do it with only a few key frames. Just like that. And on top of this you can also smooth out the temporal interpolation. So I can select my keyframes here I can hit F9, which if you remember is easy ease, which will do a very slight ease out of the first keyframe and ease into the second one. Or you can hop into the Graph Editor here. And make it even smoother. And that's just with two keyframes. Now, that you understand the basics of spacial interpolation, you're ready to move on to the next lesson, where you're gonna learn about masks.

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