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5.1 Conclusion

Thanks for watching! In this last lesson you will learn about some extra tools that you may want to have to make your transfer projects a success!

5.1 Conclusion

In this last video you're gonna learn some final tips and tricks to make sure all of your transfer projects are a success. So I wanna go over a few tools that I found helpful when dealing with photos and artwork. One of those I touched upon in a previous video and that is this little mat that I made here and this is for shooting 4x6 photos on my vacuum photo copy stand. What I found is that when you're positioning smaller pieces on the vacuum photo copy stand, it can be a little tricky to line them up. So I made this little mat here, which does two things. For one it gives me kind of a target area, so I know pretty much where to put this 4x6 photo. There's not a whole lot of other options here. And it also increases suction on this vacuum photo copy rig because it blocks most of the holes and so this area gets more suction and it makes the photos just a little bit flatter. Now this still doesn't make it extremely precise to place your photos. And if you are doing many hundreds or many thousands of photos that are all of about the same dimensions or you're doing many hundreds and thousands of 4x6 photos, what you probably wanna do is make yourself a template on your rig, it doesn't really matter if you're using a vacuum photo copy stand like this or you're just kind of using a little platform or table, it's going to help to make yourself a little template so that you can get very precise placement of those photos for each of the captures, and the reason is because you probably don't want to go and individually crop each one of those because that's gonna take just a tremendous amount of time. So instead, what you may want to do is take one, maybe a sacrificial photo, place that, get it aligned properly, and then mark the corners, maybe with a pencil or some kind of marker, something that it's going to be very easy to see so that you can get your photos aligned very, very precisely. In the example photos that I did I took ten shots of some 4x6 photos. I didn't do that but if I was going to do many hundreds of them, not for example purposes I would definitely make myself a template for setting those down because that would be very, very annoying if I had to go through and crop each one of those individually. So if you get them aligned very, very precisely when you're placing them, you can pretty much synchronize your crop for all of them. You may have to make a few small adjustments but for the most part, you're going to be able to essentially auto-make the cropping process. And that is gonna save a tremendous amount of time. Now, when it comes to handling photos or art work, you may want to acquire yourself a set of archival grade gloves. These are 100% cotton, what's called archival quality gloves. But these will help to keep your greasy mitts off of the photos. What you don't want to to do is get a bunch of your oily fingerprints all over the artwork or the photos, and then have those show up in the capture. These are very inexpensive, you can get 12 pair of these for around 7 or $8 USD on Amazon.com. So that's something that you may want to look into. Additionally, you may be dealing with photos or art that have some dust on them. And it's probably a good idea to remove that before you shoot. I mean, sure, you can get rid of that in Lightroom, if it's just one or two specks but if it's more than that, and even if it is one or two specs, it's usually better just to try and get it off before you capture it. So, a few methods that I have here, one is just a little bit of air. This is a Kyoto's Rocket Air Blower. [SOUND] Just a little hand air pump here with a little nozzle. This works pretty well and it's not extremely high pressure but, for kind of loose dust particles, and hairs and things of that nature, [SOUND] this works really good. It's also great for your lenses in your camera to make sure you don't have dust, and other junk, on your camera gear, and even your laptop as well. Now in addition to the air, you may find that there are some more stubborn dust particles. So you may have to manually get those off with something like a brush. And what I used was this lens pen here. This is a very delicate, finely bristled, very soft little brush here. And so I used this to very lightly brush off some of the extra dust particles and this worked very well. Now I'm not an archival expert, but I'm reasonably sure that this lens pen is not going to damage your photos and your artwork but you may want to look into that on your own depending on the material that you're working with. If you do have fingerprints on things like glossy prints that you want to try and remove you wanna use something thats designed for it. You don't wanna use your dirty shirt, you don't wanna use paper towels or napkins or anything like that. Again, I'm not an archival expert but I've looked into it and what seems to be recommended quite often are these pads. Something like this. These are Pec Pads and they're non-abrasive wipes. They're designed for things like optics, safe with emulsions, scanners, copiers. Things like that that are very, very sensitive. So I would go with something like this, that's going to be very, very soft and probably very, very safe. But again, I'm no archival expert. Now tape is also going to be handy to have. In general, kind of gaff tape or high tech gaff tape, this is industry tape, is handy to have if you're a photographer. But specifically, when you have your camera pointed down, and you're using a zoom lens, or even if you're not using a zoom lens, sometimes the lenses can have a tendency to creep, or basically move under their own weight. The lens elements are fairly heavy and they're not designed to kind of hold their position forever, oriented pointing straight down. So if you're doing a lot of the same size pieces of photos or art. You probably want to lock your lens down with a little bit of tape. You wanna lock the focus barrel and the lens ring so that the lens doesn't creep down and go out of focus or change your focal length and ruin your shots. I do not recommend putting cheap gaff tape or duct tape on your camera, on your lens. For most things I don't recommend that. Some kind of construction projects are fine to use that kind of stuff. But when it comes to putting things on your lens please do not put duct tape or cheap gaff tape on your camera gear. I like to use this industry tape because I think it does a better job of not leaving residue and I hate adhesive residue. Stickers, tape, it drives me insane, so, for me, I use this industry tape stuff. It's never left residue on anything and this is what I prefer. So get yourself a roll of this industry tape or at the very least a high-quality roll of gaff tape. Tape your lens so that it doesn't creep and ruin your photos. Now, additionally, I would recommend a flat black color to avoid reflections. And, speaking of reflections, you want to be aware of what you are wearing when you are capturing your photos or your art. You'll notice that I'm wearing a black shirt. That's partially because I like to wear black shirts. But also, if I was wearing anything bright, especially anything with a color, that's almost certainly going to reflect on your photos and cause some negative color casting. If I wore a bright fluorescent green shirt I can be reasonably sure that the lights are going to bounce off my shirt and onto my photos, and that's gonna screw up the color. You also want to be aware that if you are hanging your face over your rig when you're shooting, your face is going to be in that family of angles that we talked about and you may get your face reflecting in your photos, especially if you're shooting glossy prints. Number one, that's just super creepy. But two, you don't wanna deal with that in post production try to Photoshop out a reflection of your face in your art or your photos. That's not something you wanna deal with, so make sure you are a little bit away out of that family of angles when you're shooting and you'll be all set. So that about wraps it up for this course. I hope you found this information enjoyable and useful. But most importantly I hope you can put the ideas and the concepts that we talked about in this course to work in creating your own rig for transferring artwork and photos into the digital domain. Again, thanks so much for watching. My name is Dave Bodie for Envato and I'll see you around.

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