Transfering artwork to digital domain sm
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4.3 Exporting and Organization

In this lesson you will learn some techniques for exporting your photos to help keep them organized.

4.3 Exporting and Organization

In this lesson, you'll learn how to export your images, and you'll learn some techniques to help keep them organized. So, I'm here in the Library's module, and I'm not gonna go over every aspect of organization of your files and your images, but I just wanna cover a few basic things. The first is making sure you have things set up in a way that makes sense in terms of your folder structure. So, this is one of my drives and I have a folder in here called photo projects. And in here, you're looking at the photos that I shot for this course. And it's called Copy Stand Test Shots. Now this is perhaps not the greatest folder structure, because they're just in one folder and it's not very specific. If I wanted to, let's say, put these in a folder called 2015, because of the time that I shot this, it was still 2015. If I wanted to do that, because they're already imported, that would be a little bit troubling for light room, because it would have to go and kind of relocate those files. So the best way to do it, If you have to kinda reorganize your files, is to do it within light room so that light room knows where your files are. And that's pretty easy to do. If I just come over here, and on my project files folder, if I just right click on this, I can choose create folder inside of photo projects. So, I can just create one 2015. Then I can take my copy stand test shots and drag that up here. It gives me a little. A little warning message here, and I'm just gonna tell it to move. Nothing in light room is going to change, but it will enable light room to figure out where these files are. If I kind of do the opposite and I go into my folder here and I start messing with where the folders are in here, light room's not going to like that very much because it's not gonna know where those files are. So if you do have to reorder your files after you've already imported them into light room, you probably wanna do that inside of light room. If not, organize that makes the most sense to you and then import them into light room and you'll be all set. Now the next two areas you want to have kind of straightened out, are keywords and metadata. I already have some of these entered in, because they were entered in while I was capturing the images. I captured these right to Lightroom. And, if I go to File, Tethered Capture. Start Tethered Capture, I don't have my camera set up right now, but you can do some of this organization with your keywords and your metadata, and even make sure that the files are being stored in the proper location right on Capture if you're doing this tether capture. If you haven't set up kind of a profile for your meta data, you may want to do that to make sure you have the proper copyright information, your camera is already going to include a bunch of metadata about the photo, what camera was used, what focal length, aperture, exposure values. All that kind of camera technical stuff will be included, but if you want additional things, personal information, copyright data, that's something you're gonna wanna set up. Maybe create a profile. I just have one called main that I setup with my basic personal information and copyright info. If you're doing a bunch of different photos, you can't add the proper key wording for each individual photo on capture, but there may be some general keywords that you can add, what project you're working on, what client you're working on, what type of photos or art, or objects you're shooting, that sort of thing. The more keywords you can add, the better, because it'll make kind of sorting these down the road a lot easier. If you don't do a tethered capture and you kind of import them the normal way. Like, you just shot them on your camera and you're importing them into light room, you do the same thing when you import them. You have an option to select your meta data profile and add all your key wording but even after the fact, you can also go back and do it as well, so I can select all of these photos here and I'm selecting them actually in this folder location. And if I go under keywording, you can see that there are several key words that have been added. I didn't get too specific with this, cuz this is just kind of an example. But some of these have asterisks by them. That means they're only applied to some of the photos not all of them. And the ones that don't have asterisks are applied to all of the photos. I could add them after the fact, so I could add, let's say, 2015. And that'll get added to all the photos as well. You can see if I click on any individual photo, I can take a bunch of these photos here and I can add something like Indianapolis cuz that's where these were shot. And [NOISE] Rachel High School, and, now all of those have been updated. So, making sure that you get your keywords sorted out, that's gonna be very, very helpful for organization down the line. Now, within Lightroom, you can do some further organization. In something called Collections. Collections are basically virtual folders that hold sets of images, they don't have to be from anywhere specific, they can be from all over your computer without actually moving the files. So when I imported these I already created a collection and I've taken some of the files out of this collection. But you can see I have a collection named Copy Stand Test Shots. And I've deleted the photos that I don't want in here. This is just a collection of the files that I want. And I can get more specific here. I can right-click over here and create a collection set. Maybe call it copy stand. I can drag the copy stand test shots in here. I can create another collection called Rachael High School. I'll go back to this folder here and I'll just select these right here and then drag those down into this collection kind of sub folder here. So this copy stand, this is a collection set, it's basically just a set of collections. And you can get as specific as you want. You can also create smart collections. I'll let you explore that on your own. But those are kind of the basics of organization, making sure you have your file structure in a way that makes sense. You're probably gonna include things like your client, what project it is. Maybe the date, and what the subject matter is. And, you know? Be fairly specific when you're capturing and organizing your files. Then, when you're importing, making sure that you have your keywords and your metadata set up, so that you can search them later on from within Lightroom and external programs, as well. Making sure you have your keywords set is also going to help in making collections across several folders and across several hard drives even, because when you make something like a smart collection, you can have it search for keywords and it'll search the entire light room library or perhaps, a specific folder. So making sure you have those thing set up is going to be very helpful later on for organizing and keeping track of these files. Now having things organized may also help you in the export process. Let's say I wanted to Export just these Rachel High School photos. I could just jump to this collection and select all of these. And then just export these. The export process is fairly simple. I'm just gonna right click on this selection of images here. And I can choose export. This brings up this dialogue Window with just a bunch of different options. I can tell it where I want it to export, put it in a sub folder. I can name that sub folder. I can choose how the file is renamed, and I can do a bunch of custom stuff in here. I can resize the images. I can change the type of image format. I can add sharpening. I can make sure my metadata is set up properly, I can add a watermark. A lot of different things in here. What's very helpful is to set up some presets. I have one here called 1000 pics in sub folder and I believe this will put them in the same folder as the original folder. It makes a sub folder called edits small, it adds a custom name which is actually wrong. I think I should update that. And I'll just put it back to the file name. And then I'll update that with current settings. Because that was not the way that I like it. It saves them as JPEGs. It looks at the shortest edge and it re-sizes that to 1,000 pixels. It doesn't do any Sharpening. It removes my personal info and it throws a watermark on here. Can probably change this to a different watermark. But you can see, it's very helpful to have these templates when I go to export these, I can just say, use this preset. And you'll see right up here it's going to export those. And if I wanna do a different preset on top of that. I can just choose another one. This is a 16 bit tiffs in the same folder as well. You can see that I had this kind of processed stack up here. It's gonna churn through these images and if I jump to that folder, you can see it's created two folders right here. Here are the 16 bit tiffs and here are my small images here that are 1,000 pixels on the short side. And if I look here, and I go to properties and jump over to details, you're gonna see that the keywords that I listed in here are also embedded in the file as tags and that's pretty much all there is to it. Make sure you check out the last lesson in this course to get some final tips and tricks to make capturing your images a lot easier.

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