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2.2 Remote Triggering

Vibrations can reduce the sharpness of your image. In this lesson, you'll use how to use a variety of remote triggering methods to take pictures without camera shake.

2.2 Remote Triggering

In this lesson you're gonna learn about a few different ways that you can remote trigger your camera. You're going to have to manage how you're going to trigger these photos so that your camera is not moving. If you're using really, really powerful speed lights or studio strobes, you probably could trigger it by hand, although I don't recommend that, because you'll be altering the positioning of your camera, and that's just gonna lead to more variables that you probably don't wanna deal with. I'm wanna show you a few ways you can trigger your camera remotely, and this is going to help protect against the camera moving and getting blurry images, which is something you don't want. That's going to be especially important if you're using continuous lighting, which is what I'm going to be using. And I'm gonna show you exactly what that looks like coming up later on in this course. First the most simple and cheapest way to do this is to set your camera to self timer. Ten second timer, or if you have one longer than that, that may be better. Now that's not the fastest way to do it because every time you press the shutter button you have to wait those ten seconds. And like I said before, when you touch your camera, this rig is going to shake. And even if you have this on a tripod, it's going to move around a little bit. So that's not the best option. The best option is to trigger this remotely where you don't have to touch the camera. And let me show you a few of those options. First, is a basic wired shutter release. Basically this is just a wired camera trigger. This happens to be one that has an intevalometer on it. But you can find a more basic one. You may even be able to find one that works with an infrared remote. I believe these run around $20 or $30. They're fairly inexpensive, they run on a little watch battery. And it's pretty easy, you plug this into your camera, and you press the shutter button, and your camera fires. Really not too much to this. You don't have to worry about the intavelometer or any other nonsense. You basically just need a button to fire your camera remotely. And these are not universal, you will have to look on your camera to make sure that it has some kind of port to do this remote shutter release. Not all cameras are the same. Not all cameras from the same manufacturer are the same, they change these up periodically, so you wanna make sure that whatever cable release system that you get matches up with your camera. Next up is a wireless option, and these are actually remote flash triggers. But these have an option, and they come with a cable that allows you to trigger your camera remotely, and I've used them for that many, many times and they work fantastic. But, you don't have to use these with flashes. You can use them just to trigger your camera, and it works very, very well. These are fairly inexpensive. You can find them on Amazon. This particular units are made by a company called Yongnuo. And they release new models of these all the time, and just like with the wired version, you're gonna have to make sure that you find one that works with your camera, that has the right end that fits in your camera. I know they have them for Canon, and Nikon, and I believe Sony cameras, but you wanna make sure that you find the right cable plug here that fits in your camera. But these are fairly simple, you attach one of these to your camera, it sits right in the hot shoe. You plug in the plug here to the remote shutter release, and then the other one is basically just a button, and you press it and your camera takes the picture. So this is nice because you don't have a cable that you could pull and possibly mess up the alignment of your camera or move your camera like the wired solution. But on the other hand, you do have to deal with batteries and occasional misfires if there's any kind of wireless weirdness. Anytime you deal with anything wireless, you run in to the chance that there may be some interference and things don't fire, but another very inexpensive option that I found to be extremely reliable and I like using this. And finally, you can use another wired option. This is a USB cable, and you can use this to do a remote tethered capture into your computer. Now you plug one end into your camera and one end into a laptop or a desktop, and then you can use some software to remote capture images. You can use the software that maybe came with your camera, or you can something like Adobe Lightroom, capture the images right to your computer, and that way you can see them on a larger screen and that'll help you check alignment and exposure very quickly. If you use Lightroom they're already kind of right there and ready for you to start working on them as soon as you're done capturing. This is the system that I'm going to use. I like this because I can get them right on to my computer. It's fairly fast. I also have a backup on the memory card if anything goes wrong with the photos between here and there. And once I'm done, everything is right in Lightroom and I can get right to editing. So that's what I'm going to do. I'm gonna use this USB cable, I'm gonna plug it right into my camera, and I'm going to capture right into my laptop. And additional tip here, if you're going to use a wired connection, you may want to get one of these devices here. This is called a jerk stopper. And it's basically a cable clamp that attaches to your cable and then the other side you attach to your camera. And that way when you plug this guy in here to your USB port, if this cable gets pulled, if you can see here, it's going to pull this little line here and it's not going to ruin this very delicate USB port on here. A couple of hard yanks on this USB port and it will be ruined forever. So it goes a long way to protecting this very, very delicate USB jack. And you don't have to use it for this USB jack. You can use it for whatever jack you're gonna use, the cable release jack or whatever. But this really adds a nice, fairly inexpensive and very simple kind of protection here. If this gets pulled, you can see this USB cable is not going to be damaged at all. It's going to pull right here on the kind of neck strap connection to my camera, and it's not going to damage my camera at all. So I like using this little jerk stopper here, these are fairly inexpensive, like $20 or $30 on Amazon depending on the package that you get. And I always use this when I'm using this USB tethering option for my camera. Coming up with the next lesson, we're gonna look at how to est up the lights to make sure your getting a nice, even exposure on your photos or your artwork.

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