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5.5 Silence

Recording a bit of room tone can be a real help in the editing process for cleaning up noise and pasting in sections in the edit. In this lesson you will learn why it is important and how to record the room.

5.5 Silence

Recording a bit of room tone can be a big help in the edit process for cleaning up noise and pasting in sections in the edit. In this lesson, you will learn why it is important and how to record the room. Room tone is the silence recorded at a location or space when no dialogue is spoken. This seems like an odd concept, and I must admit, when I first heard of this, I didn't fully understand the point of it. Recording room tone or silence can be a valuable tool for your projects. First, it can help you to better tackle noise reduction in post-production. The type of noise reduction I'm referring to here is broadband noise, which is different than a dog barking outside. Noise reduction is not something that you will want to use a whole lot because it can cause some nasty sounding artifacts. But sometimes it's unavoidable, depending on the conditions of the recording or the location, you may have recorded some noise that needs to be dealt with. Recording ten seconds of silence at the end of your session will give you an additional tool to be able to tackle this. Sometimes, when you're in the recording zone, you're pushing to get through a script. In the edit process, you will have realized that you need to do a little bit of noise reduction, but there isn't a good spot to be able to sample the noise from, because you were in such a rush. Taking a few extra seconds in recording silence at the end of your recording can be exactly what you need to fix this situation. Because these sorts of noises can change at different times of the year, it can be a good practice to do this every time you record. This silence can also come in handy in the edit process where you have to slice and dice a section of your recording. Sometimes you have to adjust the timing of a passage and when you do there will be nothing to fill in the gaps. Having the audio drop out completely in these sections can be distracting because you will notice the absence of the room tone. In these passages, you can use your ten seconds of silence, and patch it in to fill the gaps. This is subtle, but it might be what's needed to glue parts of the voice-over together. And the more engaging you can make your voice-overs, the better off the project will be. In the last chapter of this course you will learn about working with clients and you will get some final tips and tricks for producing great sounding voice overs. Check that out coming up next.

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