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7.1 Export Your Time Lapse Video

Now that you’ve learned how to edit your shots to perfection, it’s time to ship your video out of Premiere. In this lesson, you’ll take a look at some of the export settings used to get a high-quality video ready for professional broadcast or web publishing.

7.1 Export Your Time Lapse Video

So now we've completed our video, we want to export it so we can share it online. So, let's take a look at how we export from Premiere. We simply go to the File > Export > Media. This will open a special window where we can configure the settings to export our video. So our source video is here. And our output video is here. Now, under format, I'd usually choose H264. This is going to give me an MPEG4 file. Where it says output name, I can click on that and decide the target location. I'm going to call this lake.mp4 and I'm gonna save that on my desktop. You can see here the output currently is 59 fps but my original is 24 and there's also some other funky stuff going on here. So, let's change the ratio to be correct. So, we'll go into the height and change that to 720. That should match my sequence. I want to change the frame rate from whatever that is to 24. And we're trying to match these up as best we can. Let's keep going through that. Square Pixels that's fine. Under profile it's probably set to baseline but go ahead and change that to High. Level as well you can change that. It's probably on about 3 or 3.1. Go and change that to 5.1. When it comes to bit rate, you have three different options. You have CBR, which is a constant bit rate, so every second will have the same amount of data, whereas VBR is variable, and it will allocate data based on how busy your footage is, so I often choose a two pass. That means it will look at the video once, learn from it, and on the second pass, correct any mistakes it ran into. With the target bit rate, I often go for 10, and maximum 15. There's a really good resource on Vimeo where they give you some specifications for compression. So often when students ask me, I send them to this page where you've got a host of information about all of these different settings and what they recommend is best for you. So here we are. 720p HD video. 1280 x 720. Bit rate 5,000 to 10,000. So if we come back here, this is basically where we're at with these settings. Advance Settings, Key Frame Distance, I usually set mine to the same as the frame rate. This is when you're scrubbing through the video, you don't need to worry about that too much. That's pretty much it. You could save this as a preset. So if you find yourself using these settings often, just go in here and click on that and My mp4 720, and click on OK. Now it's gonna appear in this menu, so next time I go in there and choose H264 this option will appear. If I'm all set, I can just click on export. While it's doing that, let's jump back into After Effects and look at an alternative method. Maybe we want to take just one clip. Maybe we want to share it on a stock footage site. Go into the Comp. When you're there, choose Composition > Add to Reader Queue. It has the same shortcut as the media export in Premiere which is Cmd+M, Ctrl+M if you didn't see that. Let's look again. It's under here. Ctrl+M. And slightly different controls here. What I need to do is click on where it says Lossless and chose the Format type and instead of AVI, this time we want to choose QuickTime. Once that's done, we want to go into the Format Options. And by default, it's probably on Animation, but most stock sites will ask for a MOV file, a QuickTime file, using Photo- JPEG compression. And the quality, I think if you put it round about 95, its gonna be high enough. It's gonna be a big file too. There's also gonna be an acceptable quality for what they would take on a stock footage site. So let's click OK there and click OK again. Similar to Premiere, we can make a template of that and save those settings so we don't have to do that every time. And Output, click on that, and again I'll just save that to the Desktop and click on Render. I'm just gonna whiz through and it's gonna make that video file. Let's go back to Premiere and see if that's finished exporting. I think it has so if we check the Desktop now I should have two different files. I have the mp4, which should be rather a delicious quality. There's my exported movie from the whole sequence, and if we look at this one, the properties will show you that it's a much bigger file, 54 MB. And if we look at this in full resolution, it should be pretty tidy. And there it is. And that's gonna be really nice. We shouldn't see any artifact. Or any compression problems there. So that's two methods for exporting your videos, one for sharing on YouTube and Vimeo and with your friends, and this one, which is gonna be more acceptable for professional use.

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