Unlimited AE and Premiere Pro templates, videos & more! Unlimited asset downloads! From $16.50/m

Next lesson playing in 5 seconds

Cancel
  • Overview
  • Transcript

4.1 After Effects Keyframe Basics

Keyframes are to After Effects like bread is to a sandwich. In this lesson, you are going to dive in and learn the After Effects keyframe basics!

Related Links

1.Introduction
1 lesson, 00:49

1.1
Introduction
00:49

2.Getting Started
5 lessons, 42:55

2.1
What Is After Effects?
09:56

2.2
Main Panels
10:04

2.3
Settings
07:46

2.4
After Effects Tools
08:52

2.5
More AE Tools
06:17

3.Compositions and Layers
3 lessons, 26:35

3.1
After Effects Composition
08:53

3.2
Precomposing
08:10

3.3
After Effects Layer Properties
09:32

4.Keyframes
3 lessons, 25:21

4.1
After Effects Keyframe Basics
06:39

4.2
After Effects Keyframe Easing
10:37

4.3
Spatial Interpolation
08:05

5.Masks, Shape Layers, and Text
5 lessons, 45:36

5.1
Learn How to Mask in After Effects
08:42

5.2
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 1
09:24

5.3
After Effects Shape Layers: Part 2
10:05

5.4
Text in After Effects
07:16

5.5
Text Animation and More
10:09

6.2.5D
2 lessons, 13:42

6.1
What Is 2.5D?
08:37

6.2
More 2.5D
05:05

7.Motion Tracking
4 lessons, 34:04

7.1
Motion Tracking, Camera Tracking, and 3D Text
09:11

7.2
More Motion Tracking
06:15

7.3
Camera Tracking in After Effects
07:35

7.4
3D Text in After Effects
11:03

8.Mattes and Cool Effects
4 lessons, 43:43

8.1
Mattes
10:55

8.2
EFFECTS!
10:50

8.3
MORE EFFECTS!
11:19

8.4
Mind-Blowing Third-Party Effects
10:39

9.Build a Lower Third
2 lessons, 21:35

9.1
How to Make a Lower Third in After Effects
11:01

9.2
Final Touches on the Lower Third
10:34

10.Exporting
1 lesson, 09:11

10.1
Exporting From After Effects
09:11

11.Conclusion
1 lesson, 01:16

11.1
Conclusion
01:16

12.Bonus Lessons
4 lessons, 2:14:00

12.1
How to Make an After Effects Text Animation
29:19

12.2
How to Use After Effects Intro Templates
36:45

12.3
How to Create Handwriting Animation in After Effects
34:01

12.4
How to Create Brush Effects in After Effects
33:55

13.Frequently Asked Questions
8 lessons, 1:34:42

13.1
FAQ Introduction
00:55

13.2
How to Export Video From After Effects
12:26

13.3
How to Export Video From After Effects Using PreRendering
06:44

13.4
How to Mask in After Effects
15:25

13.5
How to Animate Text in After Effects
19:31

13.6
How to Make a GIF in After Effects
13:59

13.7
How to Duplicate Layer in After Effects
20:44

13.8
Conclusion
04:58


4.1 After Effects Keyframe Basics

In this lesson, you're gonna learn about keyframe basics which is at the heart of a tremendous amount of animation. All right, so I used a lot of what you might call buzzwords in those previous sentences. Animations, keyframes, what does any of that mean? For some folks, maybe the word animation counters up hand drawn images by the folks at Disney, or something along those lines. But at the heart of it, animation is a thing that changes over time. It might change shape, position, color, intensity, blur. It could be a number of things. But the main thing to understand is that there's a point at which it is one thing, and then at a later point in time, it is something different, or it has changed in some way. And one of the most common ways to do that in After Effects is using something called keyframes. So in the previous lesson, we looked at layer properties, things like position, opacity, scale, rotation, anchor point. If you select this text layer here and press P, we can bring up one of those properties. And you may have noticed that there is a button just to the left of the word Position. It is a stop watch. if you click on this button, it will create a keyframe. That's what this is right here. It just created a keyframe. Now, in order to animate this, I'm going to have to move the CTI, or the current time indicator, to a position later in time. And then I need to make a change to this layer's position. So I can just come up here to the comp panel, I can grab my layer and I can just move it. And congratulations you have just animated a thing in After Effects. It wasn't tremendously exciting but you did it and good job. So if you move your play head back to the beginning, you can do that by just clicking and dragging here, or pressing the Home button on the keyboard. If you play this back by hitting the spacebar, You will see the animation that you just created. And that right there is the basic idea behind keyframe animation. What you did is you created keyframes. Now you created the first one by enabling the stopwatch button right here and that created a single keyframe. Now if I select this keyframe right here and delete it, you'll see that a single keyframe doesn't do anything because it's just a kind of a marker that says, okay, at this time record this position. In this case it's this position. It could be another parameter but we're working on position now. And if we move later, well, if there's not another keyframe, the layer doesn't do anything. But we can an adjustment here, to the position, or we can just click and drag and move it to a new position. And now at this time, the layer has a different position. You can see the value is different over here. You move back to here, we have a value of 960 by 540 which is the center of a 1080 composition. If you move down, this is holding the value of 665 by 957. And in between here we have movement. This is called interpolation, what's happening between these two keyframes, something. It's moving, how is it moving? Well, it's moving in a linear fashion. And what that means is the speed that it's moving in between here is a constant. As soon as it starts moving, it maintains that speed until it reaches the second keyframe. And I can show you this by looking at the graph editor, which is right here. If you click on the graph editor, and you can make some room here to see. This is showing you a graphical representation of the layer's movement, as we're working on position. Now if you don't see this exact thing, click on this button right here to the right of this eyeball. And make sure you have Speed Graph selected or Edit Speed Graph. It may be on Value Graph by default, but I want you to look at Speed Graph. This is showing you, you can get an idea from this label here, pixels per second, which is the speed that this layer is moving. So right when we hit this keyframe right here, we are traveling at a speed of 178.01 pixels per second. And we maintain that speed until we hit the second keyframe and boom. Soon as you hit that second keyframe you are at 0 pixels per second. It drops off. It's like it hits the gas and you're, boom, right at 178 pixels per second, which is not that fast. And then right here, you hit the world's biggest break, boom, and you are not moving at all, all right? That is called linear interpolation. Now, what if you didn't want it to do that? Because if you look at the movement here when you play this back, It's not particularly smooth, and I can show you this better if I take this second keyframe and just move it to the left, which will make this go a lot faster. All right, you seeing what's happening there? It starts moving. We go and then, boom, it stops. It's not very smooth. If you wanted to smooth this out a little bit more, we would need to ease this in. And we're gonna talk about that coming up in the next lesson. But before we get there, I wanna show you that you can apply the same keyframe concept to other properties. So I'm gonna bring up the rest of the transformed properties here. And we don't really need to adjust the anchor point but look, I'm gonna drop a keyframe on scale, on rotation, and opacity. And I come over to this second keyframe location. And I'm gonna just modify these. Just rotate it and make it huge, just for no reason, all right? And now look, all of these things have been animated. Coming up in the next lesson, I'm going to show you how to smooth out any animation like this and make it look just a little bit sweeter. So check that out, coming up next

Back to the top