Unlimited WordPress themes, graphics, videos & courses! Unlimited asset downloads! From $16.50/m
Cinematic drone small
  • Overview
  • Transcript

9.1 Conclusion

In this we’ll wrap up the course with a few concluding thoughts and extra drone tips.

Related Links

1.Introduction
2 lessons, 06:29

Free Lesson
1.1
Introduction
01:11

Free Lesson
1.2
Drone Project Uses
05:18

2.Equipment and Setup
2 lessons, 09:33

2.1
Technical Specs
05:29

2.2
Cameras and Gear
04:04

3.Cinematography
1 lesson, 04:46

3.1
Shooting Techniques
04:46

4.Outdoor Factors
2 lessons, 07:29

4.1
Weather Factors
03:35

4.2
Timing and Time of Day
03:54

5.Camera Setup
2 lessons, 12:46

5.1
Camera Settings
07:00

5.2
DJI GO App
05:46

6.Maintenance and Preparation
2 lessons, 11:23

6.1
Routine Maintenance
03:38

6.2
Planning for a Shoot
07:45

7.Legalities
2 lessons, 07:30

7.1
What Is Legal?
05:05

7.2
How to Obtain UAV Insurance
02:25

8.Drone Services
1 lesson, 02:36

8.1
Service Ideas
02:36

9.Conclusion
1 lesson, 02:05

9.1
Conclusion
02:05


9.1 Conclusion

In this last lesson I'm gonna recap a few things from this course. I'm also gonna go through a few extra tips to use when flying your drone. The first is limit your distractions before and while flying your UAV. No matter how much training you have, distractions will affect your judgement, so be mindful of other people around you. And the last thing you wanna do is right when you get your drone up in the air, you have people come up to you asking you questions and distracting you from operating your UAV. Next I would suggest you acquire more than one battery for your drone. This is good because while your flying your other battery can be charging. And when you're on a shoot, it's just too big of a risk depending on just one battery to get all the shots you need. Also on shoots, you may want to invest in a folding table it will make prepping your drone much easier, preventing you from having to crouch down and do all the prep on the ground. Or a much cheaper solution and one that I've done is just to purchase some foam poster board, cut it in half, and the use gaff tape to reattach the pieces, giving you an easy way to fold it up. This can may be use on grass or on top of your drone case to give you a platform to work on and to take off from. Plus it's really light weight. I also encourage you to shoot 30 frames per second. That way if your project is a 24 frames per second, you can then interpret the footage imposed from 30 to 24, which in gonna kinda slow the footage down just a little bit and give you a little bit more of a cinematic feel on the footage. Small things like this can make a huge difference. Also, get in a habit of checking what is called the K index. This measures the electromagnetic interference from the sun. This fluctuates depending on the day, and these signals could interfere with the communications between your transmitter and your drone. Just use caution on days that have a really high K index. I don't recommend trying to break your distance record on those days. I'll provide a link where you can check the daily K index. Finally, I highly recommend placing a little silica packet inside of your drone case. This will absorb any moisture that might get left in your UAV when you pack it away, and you can use any silica packet. They're often included in shipping packages, or you can order some bigger ones online for just a few dollars. I hope the things that I covered in this course will help you to create great aerial footage. Again I'm Tra Jaeger for Tuts Plus. Thanks for watching.

Back to the top