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4.4 Editing in the Timeline, Part One

Let's start turning these shots into something interesting! In this lesson you will learn how to perform some basic edits on your footage!

1.Introduction
2 lessons, 08:26

1.1
Introduction
01:12

1.2
What You Need
07:14

2.Getting Started
2 lessons, 17:21

2.1
File Structure
06:07

2.2
Quick Tour of Premiere Pro
11:14

3.Set Up Your Project
2 lessons, 18:34

3.1
Import
09:55

3.2
Organize
08:39

4.Editing Basics
5 lessons, 42:05

4.1
Creating a Sequence
10:07

4.2
Cuts
06:26

4.3
Subclips
06:46

4.4
Editing in the Timeline, Part One
11:27

4.5
Editing in the Timeline, Part Two
07:19

5.Beyond Basic Editing
4 lessons, 37:46

5.1
Adding a Cutaway Shot
10:06

5.2
Building on the Basic Edit, Part 1
07:09

5.3
Building on the Basic Edit, Part 2
09:09

5.4
Audio Transitions
11:22

6.Fine-Tuning the Look and Sound
6 lessons, 1:06:04

6.1
Video Effects
10:48

6.2
Master Clip Effects
10:47

6.3
Adjusting the Volume of Your Tracks
09:46

6.4
Audio Effects
11:17

6.5
Adding Titles
11:16

6.6
Exporting
12:10

7.Conclusion
1 lesson, 02:33

7.1
Conclusion
02:33

8.Frequently Asked Questions
1 lesson, 01:22

8.1
FAQ Introduction
01:22

9.Sharing
3 lessons, 26:40

9.1
Dynamic Link to After Effects
12:44

9.2
Exporting to HEVC for Faster Sharing Online
06:39

9.3
How to Export ProRes Video and Other Professional Formats
07:17

10.New Audio Workflows
6 lessons, 1:02:03

10.1
Using the Essential Sound Panel for Dialogue: Part 1
11:58

10.2
Using the Essential Sound Panel for Dialogue: Part 2
06:35

10.3
Using the Essential Sound Panel for SFX and Ambience
07:59

10.4
Using the Essential Sound Panel for Music
08:35

10.5
Send Audio to Audition for Editing From Premiere Pro
13:59

10.6
Mixing Audio With Killer Effects Inside Premiere
12:57

11.Essential Graphics Panel
6 lessons, 52:33

11.1
Use the Essential Graphics Panel to Create Basic Titles
12:30

11.2
Use the Essential Graphics Panel to Create a Motion Graphic Title in Premiere
13:23

11.3
Make Your Own Templates for the Essential Graphics Panel
03:51

11.4
How To Use Title Templates in the Essential Graphics Panel: Part 1
07:14

11.5
How To Use Title Templates in the Essential Graphics Panel: Part 2
07:09

11.6
How To Use Transition Templates in the Essential Graphics Panel
08:26

12.Real-World Projects
2 lessons, 24:38

12.1
Use Proxies for Faster Editing
13:42

12.2
Create Multiple Camera Shots From a Single Camera
10:56

13.New Features
3 lessons, 32:53

13.1
Using the Freeform View
09:36

13.2
Use Auto-Reframe to Crop Your Video
09:36

13.3
How to Work With Captions
13:41


4.4 Editing in the Timeline, Part One

Let's start turning these assets into something interesting. In this lesson, you will learn how to perform some basic edits on your footage. When you think about editing from a more global perspective, there are some distinct processes that you go through. They'll often include importing your media, selecting your shots, editing to the timeline, adding transitions, making adjustments to your footage and your audio, and then exporting your project. You've already learned how to import your media into Premiere, and you've learned how to prep your clips in the source monitor here to make things faster once you start editing in the timeline panel. The timeline panel is where you're going to be spending most of your time in Premiere. And there are a lot of buttons and little interface things that you're going to need to know about. Instead of going through everything right now, we're going to get to work on these clips, and I'm going to explain things as we go along. One of the most important things to know is how to navigate around in the timeline panel. And there are a few ways to do that. You have scroll bars down here, which you can click and drag, and scroll right and left. And then if you click on the end of them, there are these little handles which allow you to zoom in on your project, horizontally and zoom out on your project, horizontally. And then you have the same thing over here with these vertical scroll bars you can zoom in on the audio tracks, you can zoom in vertically on the video tracks as well. And then you can take these and scroll up and down. I find that process fairly tedious and it's much faster for me, and probably you, to use the mouse. You can use the mouse scroll wheel and some keyboard modifiers to do all of those same functions. For example, if I want to zoom out, I would hold down Alt on the keyboard, and then move the mouse scroll wheel back. If I want to zoom in horizontally, I hold Alt and then I scroll forward. And when you do this, it zooms in wherever your mouse is located. So if you want to zoom in over here, you put your mouse over here, you hold ALT down and then you scroll in. It doesn't always zoom around the playhead, so if you want to zoom in where the playhead is located, you have to move your mouse over here, and then zoom in. Now to move right and left horizontally, you can hold the Ctrl key down and then use the scroll wheel and then you can scroll right and left. If you want to scroll up and down vertically, all you do is just use the mouse scroll wheel. If you're up here in the video tracks, it will scroll up and down through the video tracks and if you're down here and the audio tracks, it scrolls up and down in the audio tracks. If you want to zoom in vertically, what you can do is move your mouse right over here, and then use your scroll wheel, and that will zoom in on these individual audio and video tracks. So most of the time when I'm moving around in the timeline panel, I'm going to be using my mouse scroll wheel. I'm gonna zoom out on my sequence here, and I'm going to click and drag and select all of these clips, and I'm going to delete them. And I'm gonna start building out the sequence with the actual shots that I wanna use. And the first shot that I wanna use is that introduction shot. So I'm gonna jump back over here to my project panel, I'm gonna expand the wide bin, and then double click again on the CCI_intro_wide. And this is the range that I have selected here for this clip. >> Have you ever had a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that left something to be desired? It can be daunting trying to find just the right recipe. Not flat, not too dry, delicious flavor, picture perfect, and best of all, easy. Hi, I'm Cheryl Ziegler and I'm going to show you in this video how to make big, bakery style cookies. >> So I'm going to start off with this shot. So I can take it right from the source window here and pull it right down into my project. Now I can click and drag the playhead and then I can play it right from my sequence here. Now, to play and pause your sequence, you can use the spacebar. >> Have you ever had a- >> But you may find it more convenient to use the J, K and L keys. The L key plays forward. >> Recipe for chocolate chip cookies that lefts something to be desired? >> The K key stops. >> It can be- >> And the J key plays backwards. >> [SOUND] >> The cool thing about using these keys is that if you double tap them, >> Thing to be desired, it can be daunting trying to find just the right recipe. >> You can play it 2x speed. You can also play it 3x speed. >> Not flat, not too dry, delicious flavor, picture perfect, and best of all, easy. >> And that can be really useful for navigating through your sequence. The other reason why you probably want to keep your hand over on the right side of the keyboard, using the J K L keys, is because a lot of the other keyboard shortcuts are going to come from this area. The I O keys, for example, are just above the J K L keys, and you can reach the Ctrl key and the Alt key with your thumb. So it's a very convenient spot to keep your hand. Let's take a look at this clip right from the beginning. If I press the Home key, it's gonna take me all the way back to the beginning of the sequence. >> Have you ever had a recipe for chocolate chip cookies- >> Now at the very beginning of the sequence, there's a little bit of space that I want to get rid of. I want to trim up the beginning of this clip. Now I could have done that over here in the source window and then pulled that back into the project, but it's gonna be much easier to get a general in and out point for your clips and then finesse the timing once you've pulled that clip into the timeline window, so you can see how it looks with the other shots. So if I move my playhead back to the beginning, and if I zoom in on this by pressing the + key, it'll actually zoom in right where the playhead is positioned. So what I wanna do is trim up the beginning here. And if I hover my mouse over the edge of this clip, it changes from a Selection tool to a Trim tool. You can see I have this little red arrow pointing to the right. So if I click this, and I drag this to the right, what that's going to do is perform a trim. This is a basic trim function. I didn't move the clip, what I did was I changed the start position for this clip by clicking the end of it and then dragging that forward. I can also jump to the end of my clip here, and then trim up the end bit here by clicking and dragging to the left. Now when you perform a basic trim like that, it'll often leave a gap. You can see that originally, this was back here and then when I made that trim, you can see that now I have a blank spot. Sometimes this is what you want, but more times than not, what you wanna use is a ripple edit. What a ripple edit does is perform the same kind of trim, but then everything after that trim, or everything to the right of it, gets scooched down the timeline to basically fill in the gaps. So let me show you how that works. I'm going to grab the end of this clip here and then drag it back to where it was. And now, when my mouse is hovered over the edge of this clip, I'm going to hold the Ctrl key down, and now the tool is going to change from a trim tool to a ripple edit tool. And now when I click and drag this to the right, watch what happens. Well, it didn't look like anything happened. Let me undo that. And I'm gonna zoom out here. Now watch again. I'm gonna click and drag to the right. Did you see what happened? The whole clip got scooched to the left, it basically filled in the gap for me. And this is called a ripple edit. Now, you can switch to a ripple edit tool if you want by hitting the B key, and that will change the tool to a Ripple Edit tool. I don't find it particularly useful to change tools like that because the ripple edit tool doesn't allow you to make Lasso selections which I do quite frequently. So I'm gonna change this tool back to the Selection tool by pressing the V key. You can see that in the tools panel here, it changed back to the Selection tool. With that little edit there, what I've done is clean up the beginning. So I'm gonna press the + key here on my keyboard and zoom in. And I'll play right from the beginning. >> Have you ever had a recipe for- >> So that looks like it's starting too soon. >> Have you ever had a- >> It's basically starting right on her word. So what I'm gonna do is back it up a little bit. So I'm going to hold the Ctrl key down, and I'm gonna click and drag to the left by a few frames >> Have you ever had a recipe- >> And now I get this nicer starting point here where she's taking a breath, and it seems just a little bit more natural to me. Now if I jump back up here to the source monitor, you can see that there's actually quite a bit left on this entire clip. The part that we're using is this part here that's marked by the in and the out point. But if I scrub through this clip, by clicking and dragging, and then I play by pressing the L key. >> Yeah, definitely. >> That's almost perfect. >> Okay. >> Whenever you're ready, action. >> Have you ever had a recipe? >> There's another take that Cheryl does of this introduction. So let's play the second introduction. >> Whenever you're ready, action. >> Have you ever had a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that left something to be desired? It can be daunting trying to find just the right recipe. Not flat, not too dry, delicious flavor, picture perfect, and best of all, easy. Hi, I'm Cheryl Ziegler, and in this video, I'm going to show you how to make bakery style delicious chocolate chip cookies. >> Good. >> I think since I took these out, I've been adding delicious, is that okay, is that gonna mess you up? >> No, it's fine. >> Okay. >> It's fine. >> I'm trying to find just. >> So there's a second take here, and we have some more options to choose from, but let's keep playing. >> Let's play around the previous one, sure? >> Sure. >> All right. Go ahead. Action. >> Have you ever had a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that left something to be desired? It can be daunting trying to find just the right recipe. Not flat, not too dry, picture perfect, and best of all, easy. Hi, my name is Cheryl Ziegler and in this video I'm going to show you how to make big bakery style chocolate chip cookies. >> So I like the last take that Cheryl did. And what I'd probably do is use just the end bit from where she says, hi, my name is Cheryl Ziegler. So what I could do here is scroll to that point. [SOUND] So it's right about here, I'm gonna mark another in point. >> Hi, my name is Cheryl Ziegler and in this video, I'm going to show you how to make big bakery style chocolate chip cookies. >> And then I'll mark an out point right here. I'm going to jump back to the timeline panel, and there are several ways that I can edit together this first part of the clip and the second part of the clip. What I need to do is find where Cheryl says, hi, my name is Cheryl Ziegler, in this first clip, and then get rid of all the stuff that's after that. And you're gonna learn how to do that coming up in the next lesson.

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